Home gadgets open to hackers | The Telegraph

Consumers who buy internet-enabled devices such as televisions, refrigerators and even kettles are leaving themselves open to hackers who could use them to gain access to their bank accounts, one of the country’s most senior police officers has warned.Many household appliances can now be linked up to the internet to help streamline the home. Fridges can provide reminders of when to buy milk, while televisions can offer advice on what programmes to watch.

Source: Home gadgets open to hackers | The Telegraph

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Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers | Motherboard

Security researchers have found a new bug that would allow hackers to take full control of several types of Internet of Things devices.

Hackers could hijack thousands of Internet of Things devices around the world, such as security cameras, due to a flaw in a piece of software used by several major manufacturers.

Security researchers found a bug in an open source software library that, when tested on an Internet of Things camera, allows hackers to remotely access the video feed of a camera, install a backdoor in the device, or block the camera’s owner from accessing it. Researchers say it would work on other IoT devices as well—in other words, hackers would have total control over the vulnerable products, they said.

Source: Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers | Motherboard

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Finding the balance of security, mobility in an Internet of Things world | FederalNewsRadio.com

The use of mobile technologies and the evolution to the Internet of Things (IoT) is reshaping the way government executes on its mission. From smartphones and tablets that let employees work from anywhere at any time to the wide adoption of WiFi at places like the Pentagon.At the same time, the move to mobile presents a major challenge—cybersecurity. How can agencies secure the ever-growing number of devices?

Among the most startling findings of a Homeland Security Department report from March was that mobile devices could become an avenue to attack back-end computer systems containing the data of millions of Americans and sensitive information related to federal government functions.

Source: Finding the balance of security, mobility in an Internet of Things world | FederalNewsRadio.com

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Enabling a healthy relationship with IoT in healthcare | IoT Agenda

An aging demographic, shrinking budgets and increased demands are driving the urgent need for solutions across the healthcare sector. While running headfirst into innovation may be tempting, the healthcare sector presents a series of challenges, meaning that IoT developers need to take a slow-and-steady-wins-the-race approach if they are to achieve results that are as futureproofed as possible; their solutions could become a matter of life and death.

Source: Enabling a healthy relationship with IoT in healthcare | IoT Agenda

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73% Are Using Internet Of Things Data To Improve Their Business | Forbes

These and many other insights are from the recently published Cisco Internet of Things (IoT) study, The Journey to IoT Value: Challenges, Breakthroughs, and Best Practices published on SlideShare last month. The study is based on a survey of 1,845 IT and business decision-makers in the United States, UK, and India. Industries included in the analysis include manufacturing, local government, retail/hospitality/sports, energy (utilities/oil & gas/mining), transportation, and health care. All respondents worked for organizations that are implementing or have completed IoT initiatives. 56% of all respondents are from enterprises.

Source: 73% Are Using Internet Of Things Data To Improve Their Business | Forbes

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Fraud and the Internet of Things | Network World

According to Gartner, the number of world-wide Internet connected devices will grow to 11.4 billion by 2018. It’s a phenomenal trend that will continue to spread until human and machine connectivity becomes ubiquitous and unavoidably present. Of course, anything that develops this rapidly will bring a lot of growing pains, and the IoT is no exception. Security hazards are one of the largest concerns. Security has received very little, if any attention. We must remain vigilant.

Source: Fraud and the Internet of Things | Network World

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Should We Disconnect to Improve IoT Security? | Security Intelligence

‘When I do media spots, interviewers often ask me, “What is the best single thing you can do to prevent cyberattacks?” I jokingly respond, “Unplug and turn off all your devices — it’s a 100 percent security solution!” Ironically, when discussing Internet of Things (IoT) security, some people believe turning all devices off is an actual strategy.’

Source: Should We Disconnect to Improve IoT Security?| Security Intelligence

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Internet of Things will fuel digital transformation | Computer Dealer News

‘To survive in the modern business climate created by increasingly sophisticated technology, companies need to embark on a digital transformation journey. But technology isn’t just disrupting the business environment; it can also be used to keep up with changes.The Internet of Things (IoT) is one innovation that can accelerate digital transformation, according to experts at Ingram Micro’s IoT Evolve event in Toronto on June 14.

“IoT will fuel digital transformation because it enables productivity, reduces costs, and enables faster customer response,” Rick Huijbregts, VP of digital transformation and innovation at Cisco Canada, tells the audience. “Connectivity allows businesses to still do what they’re doing, but just faster and smarter. It allows them to dream big.”’

Source: Internet of Things will fuel digital transformation | Computer Dealer News

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How 5G will revolutionize the Internet of Things | Business Insider

Fifth-generation mobile networks — 5G, for short — will be able to transmit data about 10 times faster than 4G LTE, the current standard.

That could revolutionize the IoT. And although it will take time to roll out, it’s already being embraced by hardware makers and telecoms thanks to a March decision by 3GPP, an association of telecoms, to approve faster initial 5G standardization. That means adoption will come in the next few years — Ericsson projects that 5G will reach about 15% of the world’s population by 2022.

Ericcson expects 5G to first be deployed in major metropolitan areas, so IoT applications it’ll be first be used to connect probably will be smart city solutions like connected streetlights and traffic lights. But 5G eventually will connect everything from smart home devices to self-driving cars and robotics.

Source: How 5G will revolutionize the Internet of Things | Business Insider

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The fight to defend the Internet of Things | Network World

“The Internet has entered a new chapter called the Internet of Things (IoT). It follows the fixed-Internet era characterized by connected PCs and laptops through the 1990s, and builds on the mobile-Internet era spearheaded by the proliferation of smartphones during the first two decades of this century. This new chapter has a new set of challenges and opportunities because it involves a broader diversity of devices — ranging from connected light bulbs, smart gas meters and smart speakers, to IP monitoring cameras, smart watches, drones, and robots. And while the connectivity and compute requirements of these IoT devices vary widely, they all have a common need: strong security.”

Source: The fight to defend the Internet of Things | Network World

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