Intel updates embedded toolsuite but says it’s scaling back its IoT effort | LinuxGizmos

Intel launched Intel System Studio 2019, updating the Linux-friendly embedded toolsuite with improved performance and enhanced I/O analysis. Meanwhile, due to soaring demand for Intel’s Core and Xeon sales, it’s scaling back its lower-end IoT business.

Intel has a habit of launching and the discontinuing special projects outside its core processor business, but one experiment that has stuck around is Intel System Studio. A lot has changed since we last checked on the Intel System Studio (ISS) development toolsuite when it launched in 2013. For example, while initially targeting both mobile and embedded software development for Linux and Android running on Intel processors, with the dissolution of Intel’s mobile business, it is now focused on optimizing embedded IoT applications running on its Atom, Core, and Xeon processors.

Source: Intel updates embedded toolsuite but says it’s scaling back its IoT effort | Linux Gizmos

Share

The internet of things is becoming a surveillance tool | Stacey on IoT

Whenever I’m away from home, in the morning I like to check in on my family by looking at the doorbell camera where I can see them leave for work and school. In the evening, I can generally tell if my daughter is upstairs in her room based on the lighting scenes there; I can also tell when my husband is working out. Sometimes, if I try to call them and they aren’t home, I check in on our car to see where it (and they) might be.

While my family is aware of all of the devices we have, sometimes my use of those devices does creep them out a bit. But they know me, love me, and understand that I do this in order to connect with them when I am on the road. And if they asked me to stop checking in, I would.

Source: The internet of things is becoming a surveillance tool | Stacey on IoT

Share

The Internet of Things: Optimizing Manufacturing Exponentially | Manufacturing.net

Discussion around digitalization of manufacturing evokes a variety of opinions, ranging from optimistic to not-so-optimistic. These conversations exist because digitalization cannot be overlooked or ignored. The evolution of manufacturing demonstrates growth. As per BLS data, there has been an adjusted growth of almost 80 percent in manufacturing output from 1987 to Q1 of 2017 in the US. Pew Research also reveals a remarkable growth of 166 percent in manufacturing output of durable goods in about the same period, with output growth of nondurable goods at 17 percent. While the data clearly indicates that manufacturing does not require a spark of resurgence, there are still challenges. Operational efficiencies struggle to keep up with growth. Costs are mounting. There’s unplanned downtime, and the pressure of customized output. The way to remain competitive is through a commitment to digital transformation. A half-hearted approach will not yield the right results.

Source: The Internet of Things: Optimizing Manufacturing Exponentially | Manufacturing.net

Share

A Perfect Team: How Blockchain Can Drive the Internet of Things | IoT Evolution

It”s not surprising that emerging technologies like blockchain and the Internet of Things draw a great amount of interest among enterprises. These technologies separately come with significant potential to improve challenges that organizations face, such as risk management and operations tracking. Only a small subset of businesses have started implementing the Internet of Things, however, blockchain may be able to change that, and pairing these two solutions together can unlock possibilities for businesses. What should enterprises know about implementing blockchain, and how it might help the Internet of Things?

Source: A Perfect Team: How Blockchain Can Drive the Internet of Things | IoT Evolution

Share

The Internet of Things: A technology in desperate need of a protocol | JAXenter

What is the missing protocol that will prove an essential companion to the internet of things and the data economy that comes with it? Blockchain, sort of. In this article, Henri Pihkala discusses the demand for a real-time data economy and what’s needed to support the secure transport, storage and monetisation that the new data economy demands.

Source: The Internet of Things: A technology in desperate need of a protocol | JAXenter

Share

IoT Security by Design | No Jitter

portable

IoT device manufacturers and service providers should follow certain guidelines to ensure security.

The Internet of Things (IoT) has a poor reputation when it comes to cyber security. Frequently manufacturers and IoT service providers often do not implement appropriate safeguards. Businesses and consumers typically do not change the default passwords nor update the pre-installed software.

IoT security is too easy to ignore. What could happen with these IoT devices if they are not properly secured?

Source: IoT Security by Design | No Jitter

Share

The Race to IoT Security | iHLS

IoT

Cybersecurity is an ongoing concern for many, especially with the proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies. The importance of securing IoT is increasingly evident, as seen during the Internet of Things Global Summit earlier this month, as well as the recent IoT cybersecurity law passed in the state of California, for the first time ever in the U.S.

The bill was introduced last year and passed the state senate in late August. The law covers “smart” devices.

Source: The Race to IoT Security | iHLS

Share

The Cybersecurity 202: California’s new Internet of Things law only protects against a small portion of cyberthreats | The Washington Post

“Password123” isn’t an easy password option anymore. At least, it isn’t in California.

The Golden State’s governor just signed a law barring companies from selling Internet-connected devices with preprogrammed passwords that are easy to guess or crack and leave them vulnerable to malicious hackers. Starting in 2020, all Internet of Things devices made or sold in California — whether they’re refrigerators, thermostats or cars — must come equipped with unique passwords, or a feature that requires the user to set their own unique password.

The law makes California the first state in the country to set cybersecurity standards for the rapidly proliferating IoT business. It’s a step toward defending against cyberattacks such as the massive Mirai botnet that harnessed the power of hijacked devices to disable major websites in 2016.

Source: The Cybersecurity 202: California’s new Internet of Things law only protects against a small portion of cyberthreats – The Washington Post

Share

Government launches internet of things code of practice | Software Testing News

The UK government has launched a new voluntary internet of things code of practice to help manufacturers boost the security of Internet-connected devices such as virtual assistants, connected home devices, smartwatches and toys.

Leading tech companies have voiced their support for the new IoT code and the importance of strengthened security practices in internet-connected devices, HP Inc. and Centrica Hive Ltd being the first to sign up to commit to the code.

The internet of things code of practice will ensure that businesses continue to strengthen the cyber security of their products at the design stage.

Source: Government launches internet of things code of practice | Software Testing News

Share

Rivals ARM and Intel make peace to secure Internet of Things | Reuters

Rival semiconductor giants ARM and Intel (INTC.O) have agreed to work together to manage networks of connected devices from both firms, clearing a major stumbling block to market growth of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT).

Britain’s ARM, a unit of Japan’s Softbank Corp (4726.T), said on Monday it had struck a strategic partnership with Intel to use common standards developed by Intel for managing IoT devices, connections and data.

Source: Rivals ARM and Intel make peace to secure Internet of Things | Reuters

Share