Industrial IoT: move slow and make things | TNW

Industrial IoT: move slow and make things

Are you tired of hearing how ICOs are disrupting fundraising? The first five months of 2018 saw funds raised through token sales jump to $13.7 billion, around double the amount raised in the whole of 2017. Venture capital funding is not going away any time soon. We’re going to see a change in funding models and the growth of hybrid models thanks to cryptocurrencies, but there’s one thing that’s not going to change, and that’s investment in disruptive ideas and the people behind them.

These ideas bear fruit when you consider the Internet of Things. There are few industries that devices with sensors and platforms aren’t impacting. There’s a seemingly endless array of verticals including healthcare, agtech, manufacturing, connected cars, utilities and smart cities.

Source: Industrial IoT: move slow and make things | TNW

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Darktrace releases Internet of Things security report | Business Insider

parking lot

In a recent incident, hackers took control of a digital parking kiosk and connected it to websites featuring adult content, according to researchers at the cybersecurity company Darktrace. The kiosk didn’t actually display the content, which actually makes the stunt more confusing: If it wasn’t for a weird prank, then why even bother?

“It’s unknown what the attacker’s motive might have been,” says Darktrace.

But it points to a worrisome trend, as Darktrace will reveal in its annual Threat Report, to be released on Wednesday, which highlights bizarre and unexpected ways that so-called black hat hackers attempt to subvert and infiltrate networks. The key takeaway is that if there’s a flaw, hackers will find and exploit it.

Source: Darktrace releases Internet of Things security report | Business Insider

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The Industrial Internet Of Things, Digitalization And The Future Of Business | Forbes

It started with “every company is a technology company,” moved to “every business is a digital business” and now I think we’re at “every industry is an internet of things (IoT) industry.”

The technology that powers an organization has become just as essential to success as the product or service a venture provides. Every sector — from finance to agriculture to transportation to healthcare to government to media — is subject to this truth. Business technology must now interconnect people with the proliferating devices, data and systems that populate our digitalized world via the internet. The type of infrastructure that enables a business to address this evolution is dubbed the industrial internet of things (IIoT), but it really isn’t a separate concern. It’s all part of the same movement pushing modern commerce into its future state.

Source: The Industrial Internet Of Things, Digitalization And The Future Of Business | Forbes

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To Grow The Internet Of Things, Improve Security | Forbes

 

The Internet of Things continues to grow rapidly, but concerns about security remain a significant barrier and are hindering the adoption of IoT devices.

Research by Bain & Company finds that enterprise customers would be willing to buy more IoT devices if their concerns about cybersecurity risks were addressed—on average, at least 70% more than what they might buy if their concerns remain unresolved. In addition, 93% of the executives we surveyed say they would pay an average of 22% more for devices with better security. Bain estimates that improving security solutions for these devices could grow the IoT cybersecurity market by $9 billion to $11 billion in 2020.

Source: To Grow The Internet Of Things, Improve Security | Forbes

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The scope for innovation through IoT is simply too great to ignore | Business Matters

The Internet of Things, or IoT, is one of the more recent technological terms to have crept into the mainstream media in recent years.
It’s safe to assume that the majority of consumers and businesses will have now heard the phrase many times, and yet there remains a lack of understanding about exactly what IoT means Ritam Gandhi, director and founder, Studio Graphene explains more.

As an agency that works with budding entrepreneurs at the very start of their business journey, as well as innovation teams within larger companies, at Studio Graphene we have witnessed this knowledge gap first hand. Simply put, education is required so that, first and foremost, more people understand what is meant by IoT; secondly, and more importantly, professionals across both the public and private sectors must have a firmer grasp on exactly how IoT can deliver positive change within their organisations.

Source: The scope for innovation through IoT is simply too great to ignore | Business Matters

 

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IOT Devices Take Hold, And Internet Of Things Eclipses The Internet Of People | Investor’s

Internet of Things (IoT) concept

For years, technologists have talked about the coming age of IoT, or the Internet of Things. And it’s finally here. For every person on the internet doing work or being entertained, a multitude of machines are automatically reporting device location, temperature, speed and other status data online. About 4 billion people use the internet. But that number is dwarfed by the roughly 12 billion devices sending data over the internet, often with little or no human intervention.

Source: IOT Devices Take Hold, And Internet Of Things Eclipses The Internet Of People | Investor’s

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How Cryptojacking Can Corrupt the Internet of Things | Scientific American

How Cryptojacking Can Corrupt the Internet of Things

Cyber criminals shut down parts of the Web in October 2016 by attacking the computers that serve as the internet’s switchboard. Their weaponof choice? Poorly secured Web cameras and other internet-connected gadgets that have collectively come to be known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The attack created a minor panic among people trying to visit Sony PlayStation Network, Twitter, GitHub and Spotify’s Web sites, but it had little long-term effect on internet use or the hijacked devices. Less than two years later, however, security experts are sounding the alarm over a new and possibly more nefarious type of IoT attack that “cryptojacks” smart devices, surreptitiously stealing their computing power to help cyber criminals make digital money.

Source: How Cryptojacking Can Corrupt the Internet of Things | Scientific American

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Your IoT Is Probably Not A-OK | Forbes

A few weeks ago, major retailers stopped selling toys from the company CloudPets after more than 2 million recorded messages were leaked in a major security breach. Internet of things (IoT) security breaches are as prevalent as they’re varied. From medical devices and traffic lights to automobiles and toys, each hitherto unconnected device that now joins the big bad world wide web brings additional security mysteries to the fore. And with over 20 billion connected devices projected to be in use by 2020, these are mysteries we must unravel.

There are plenty of reasons for the current gaps in IoT security including a lack of regulation, market failures and stakeholder indifference, although none of these are insurmountable. Even considering these challenges, there are concrete steps that we can take to avoid future IoT mishaps and eventual attacks by an animatronic locust swarm.

Source: Your IoT Is Probably Not A-OK | Forbes

 

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Internet of things: security concerns over cheap IoT toys and gadgets | Lovemoney

Internet of Things (otherwise known as IoT) devices have seen a huge rise in popularity in recent years.

In a bid to satisfy the consumer craving for convenience and connectivity, manufacturers have been aggressively adding wireless connectivity to their entire product line.

We’re living in a world where fridges come with WiFi, cars with Twitter and toothbrushes with Bluetooth are widely available.

Whenever a big name manufacturer releases a new “smart” or “connected” product, researchers like myself are drawn to investigating the potential security and privacy issues that device may have.

For the most part, these manufacturers are pretty good at responding to any concerns and fixing issues fairly quickly.

Source: Internet of things: security concerns over cheap IoT toys and gadgets | Lovemoney

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IoT Security Flaw Leaves 496 Million Devices Vulnerable At Businesses: Report | CRN

 

 

 

 

 

Nearly a half-billion Internet of Things devices are vulnerable to cyberattacks at businesses worldwide because of a 10-year-old security flaw, according to a new report from a security software vendor.

The report was published Friday by Armis, a provider of Internet of Things security software for enterprises that focuses on detecting threats in IoT devices at workplaces. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based company has previously made security disclosures, including the BlueBorne malware attack that impacted 5 billion IoT devices.

The web exploit in question is called DNS rebinding, an attack first disclosed at the RSA Conference in 2008 that allows an attacker to bypass a network firewall and use a victim’s web browser to access other devices on the network. The attacker can gain access to the web browser through a malicious link enclosed within an email, banner ad or another source. This can leave devices susceptible to data exfiltration, compromise and hijacking, the latter of which could lead to a botnet attack similar to the Mirai malware that took down major websites in 2016.

Source: IoT Security Flaw Leaves 496 Million Devices Vulnerable At Businesses: Report | CRN

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