The darkside of the internet of things: The security challenge | IoT Agenda

Even though they differ greatly, what analyst and vendor projections all agree on is that the number of connected internet of things devices will essentially go through the roof over the next couple of years. Estimates range anywhere from 20 to 50 billion connected IoT devices by 2020 — with Gartner, for example, projecting 20 billion devices as more a “conservative” estimate, if there ever is a conservative view in light of these stunning figures. But no matter how many billions of devices it will finally be, one thing is for sure — it’s going to be huge!

Source: The darkside of the internet of things: The security challenge | IoT Agenda

How the Internet of Things Inspired a New Startup Niche | Entrepreneur

Once upon a time, computers were pretty much the only devices that connected to the internet. These days, that idea is a fairytale.The reality is an incredible number of products are now connected to the web, from refrigerators to watches, clothing, cars, thermostats, light bulbs, and alarm systems. By 2020, an estimated 20-plus billion items will belong to the so-called “Internet of Things” (IoT).

Source: How the Internet of Things Inspired a New Startup Niche | Entrepreneur

Kaspersky unveils operating system for embedded systems and IoT devices | IT PRO

KasperskyOS, as it has been called, works by only allowing documented operations to run. A developer must create their applications using traditional code and at the same time, define a strict security policy to include a range of documented functionalities.

Source: Kaspersky unveils operating system for embedded systems and IoT devices | IT PRO

The internet of things can be hacked – and the risks are growing every day | TechRadar

We’re rapidly entering a new phase of technological evolution, in which pretty much everything around us is connected to the internet. The term used to describe this increasingly connected ecosystem is the internet of things (IoT), and it’s attracting the biggest names in tech, from Apple to Samsung and everyone in between.If the tech pundits are right, everything from toasters to light bulbs will soon have internet functionalities.

Source: The internet of things can be hacked – and the risks are growing every day | TechRadar

The Internet Of Things Is A Cyber-Disaster In The Making | @dailycaller

The Internet of things (IoT) is certainly a convenience to us all, but it’s also a pathway to chaos for cyber criminals and enemies of the United States. Eric Lieberman, technology and law reporter for The Daily Caller tells of an unnamed university that was hacked through its light bulbs and vending machines.

Source: The Internet Of Things Is A Cyber-Disaster In The Making | @dailycaller

How To Make 2017 The Year Of IoT Security | Forbes

People who make Internet of Things (IoT) devices still aren’t getting the message on security. And as these devices proliferate, the danger of increased attacks is getting more real.Late last year, popular internet services such as Netflix and Twitter were temporarily taken down amid a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that involved hackers deploying malware to simple webcams that many of us use without thinking. Authorities in the U.S. and U.K. were investigating the Mirai malware used in the attack to create a botnet, an army of zombie devices commanded by hackers. In fact, the Mirai code is still available online, allowing those with only modest technical skills to continue disrupting internet services on a major scale.

Source: How To Make 2017 The Year Of IoT Security | Forbes

Government’s Role in the Internet of Things | Cisco Blogs

Governments around the world are beginning to realize that IoT adoption will be one of the key factors defining the competitiveness of their cities, provinces, countries, or regions and that IoT can help solve many of the chronic problems plaguing their economies and their environments. Thus, governments at various levels have a number of key roles to play…

Source: Government’s Role in the Internet of Thing | Cisco Blogs

Four Security Priorities Will Drive Adoption of the Industrial Internet of Things | Industry Week

The potential of the Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) is bound only by the limits of our creativity. But its realization will forever be tied to security.We’ve seen this trend play out among early Industrial IoT adopters in the oil and gas industry, where there is tremendous motivation to adopt networked technologies and smart sensors. Many oil and gas facilities, especially offshore platforms, are located in environments we call “4D” – dirty, distant, dull and dangerous. In these harsh areas, automation and remote management can increase efficiency, improve performance, and enhance profitability. But most importantly, they keep people out of harm’s way.

Source: Four Security Priorities Will Drive Adoption of the Industrial Internet of Things | Industry Week

The Internet of Things Means a Big Dilemma for Big Law Discovery | National Law Journal


“In the midst of the ensuing investigation, authorities think they may have found a new witness. That potential witness, however, wasn’t one of the people having drinks that night. It was Amazon Echo, a web-connected wireless speaker that, upon voice command, can provide information on a variety of topics and music. The device is, as some users put it, “always listening,” i.e., always ready to receive a command. Upon making a request of the device, it also records under 60 seconds of sound from its surroundings, which is erased as new sound as recorded. Amazon, however, refuses to release information on customers unless legally required.”

Source: The Internet of Things Means a Big Dilemma for Big Law Discovery | National Law Journal

Hackers expect replies, not rewards, for finding bugs | Cyberscoop

“More than 9 in 10 cybersecurity researchers who find software vulnerabilities generally let the makers know and coordinate their disclosure, according to a new survey from a Commerce Department working group published Thursday.Only 1 in 6 (15 percent) expect any kind of reward, but nearly three-quarters (70 percent) expect to be engaged by the maker. It’s frustration around unmet communications expectations that’s most often the cause of unilateral disclosure, according to the survey report Vulnerability Disclosure Attitudes and Actions published by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.”

Source: Hackers expect replies, not rewards, for finding bugs | Cyberscoop