Is cybersecurity keeping up with the internet of things? | The Telegraph

With the growth of connected devices and the internet of things, consumers must adopt simple steps to help keep themselves cyber secure.

By the end of this year, there will be more than eight billion internet of things (IoT) devices connected worldwide, according to analysts Gartner – from electricity meters to smart fridges.

Many families buy such gadgets without imagining they might pose a security risk, but they still tend to be less well-secured than devices such as PCs. This means that families should be careful both when choosing and setting up their IoT devices, according to Det Insp Mick Dodge, National Cyber PROTECT coordinator with the City of London Police.

Source: Is cybersecurity keeping up with the internet of things? | The Telegraph

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How do you solve a problem like Internet of Things platform security? | Computer Business Review

Internet of Things

Internet of Things products are notorious for their cybersecurity vulnerabilities, and data protection protocol is struggling to keep pace with innovation demand. With the best will in the world, IoT networks cannot be secured without the tools for the job – yet Forrester has found half of tech security leaders do not have sufficient tools for enforcing policies.

Data privacy is undoubtedly top of the agenda for IT security professionals and recent research findings confirmed this, with 92% of respondents confirming they have security policies in place for managing IoT devices.

Source: How do you solve a problem like Internet of Things platform security? | Computer Business Review

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5 predictions for the Internet of Things in 2018 and beyond | Network World

wireless network globe - internet of things edge [IoT] - edge computing

The Internet of Things (IoT) has started to move to the mainstream in enterprises across all industries. With IoT spending set to increase by 15 percent to reach $772.5 billion by the end of 2018, the coming year will undoubtedly bring further growth in the number of connected devices and enterprise IoT projects. More importantly, I believe that in 2018 enterprise IoT projects will finally move beyond merely automating existing business processes, to truly transforming industries by creating entirely new revenue streams and business models. This will be due in part to the concurrent rise of synergistic technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and fog computing, as well as an industry-wide move toward greater interoperability, standards and collaboration.

Source: 5 predictions for the Internet of Things in 2018 and beyond | Network World

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These Jaw-Dropping Facts Will Change Your Mind About the Internet of Things | Motley Fool

Image of city with icons of connectivity.

It’s easy to be skeptical about new technology trends. There’s always something new that tech companies are peddling, and their devices sometimes fall short of expectations. But when it comes to the Internet of Things (IoT) — where formerly unconnected things are connected to the internet to track and analyze data — there are plenty of reasons why investors should fight the urge to be skeptical.

The IoT is already prevalent, and it’s transforming how many business keep track of their equipment, it’s creating new products for major tech companies, and it’s transforming how we interact with our homes. If you’re still skeptical that the IoT is worth investing in, take a look at some the facts…

Source: These Jaw-Dropping Facts Will Change Your Mind About the Internet of Things | Motley Fool

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A New Way to Track Down Bugs Could Help Save IoT | WIRED

On a clear day this summer, security researcher Ang Cui boarded a boat headed to a government biosafety facility off the northeastern tip of Long Island. Cui’s security company, Red Balloon, will spend the next year studying how its Internet of Things threat-scanning tool performs on the building control systems of Plum Island Animal Disease Center. If successful, the project could provide a critical tool in the fight against vulnerabilities in embedded industrial systems and critical infrastructure.

“The island is only accessible via a ferry. The dock is protected by armed guards and I presume patrolled by the Coast Guard,” Cui says. Those protections, though, mean nothing to potential hackers. So Cui’s goal is to “help make the island’s cybersecurity as resilient as its physical security.”

Source: A New Way to Track Down Bugs Could Help Save IoT | WIRED

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The Internet of Things: The security crisis of 2018? | Information Age

The infinite possibilities and potential applications surrounding the Internet of Things (IoT) have been well-hyped over the past few years, but the technology is at a tipping point in terms of adoption as we head into 2018.

IoT, the ability of everyday devices to connect and transfer data to each other, is already carving out a place in the consumer market, with devices like smart home locks, thermostats, lighting and energy monitors.

The latest research also claims that 29% of organisations have already implemented IoT solutions, and this is expected to surge to 48% in 2018, as businesses are increasingly sold on the cost-savings and the productivity-enhancing benefits of IoT.

Source: The Internet of Things: The security crisis of 2018? | Information Age

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12 Emerging Internet of Things (IoT) Trends That Will Become Mainstream In 2018 | CMS Wire

 

IoT trends to watch for in 2018

In November, in a dive into what is driving enterprise interest in the Internet of Things (IoT) we found that, for the moment at least, enterprises are still wrestling with the problems the IoT poses rather than harvesting the benefits that it offers. There is nothing unusual in this given that the IoT is still a relatively new phenomena and there are considerable — and justified — security fears dominating enterprise strategies around the IoT.

Source: 12 Emerging Internet of Things (IoT) Trends That Will Become Mainstream In 2018 | CMS Wire

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Internet of Things Finally Shows Signs of Becoming a Mass Market | TheStreet

A year ago at CES 2017, the proverbial Internet of Things looked full of promise, but also fairly immature.

Many top electronics, home appliance and industrial equipment vendors had only begun fleshing out their IoT offerings, proprietary solutions were often needed to control devices and seeing devices from different vendors play nice with each other was quite rare.

This time around at CES 2018, one could find pretty comprehensive home IoT product lines from the likes of Samsung (SSNLF) , LG, Panasonic, Huawei and Haier. There were also a slew of intriguing and reasonably-priced consumer IoT solutions from startups. Examples include water-monitoring devices for tracking usage and detecting leaks; tiny health sensors that can be integrated with fitness bands and track everything from blood pressure to stress levels; and bikes and scooters with built-in navigation and smart speaker function.

Source: Internet of Things Finally Shows Signs of Becoming a Mass Market | TheStreet

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Business Is Embracing Internet Of Things As Most Important Technology | Forbes

The Internet of Things (IoT) is heralded as a foundational technology for breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, robotics and other potentially broadly applicable advances. But for frontline decision makers—the executives charged with implementing the IoT in their company—it can sometimes feel impossible to separate the facts from the hype. It can be even more daunting to discern the practical steps required to get started with IoT in their business.

Source: Business Is Embracing Internet Of Things As Most Important Technology, Says New Study | Forbes

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Cyberattack Targets Safety System at Saudi Aramco | Foreign Policy

Malicious software attacked a safety system in August at Saudi Aramco, the world’s largest oil company, in what is the first-ever example of malware targeting the computer systems designed to prevent a disaster at an industrial facility.

The attack was first described by the computer security firm FireEye in a blog post last week, which did not name the victim of the attack. But a confidential report obtained by Foreign Policy and authored by Area 1 Security, a computer security firm founded by veterans of the U.S. National Security Agency, identifies Aramco as the victim of the attack.

In a statement, Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s national oil company and a pillar of its economy, denied the attack took place: “Saudi Aramco corporate and plants networks were not part of any cyber security attack or breach.”

Source: Cyberattack Targets Safety System at Saudi Aramco – Foreign Policy

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