BlackBerry and Telus partner with Ottawa-based accelerator for new IoT-focused program | Financial Post

Ottawa-based software as a service (SaaS) accelerator program L-Spark Corp. is launching a new Secure IoT Accelerator program, working with Telus Corp, BlackBerry Ltd. and Solace, the group announced on Wednesday.

The program will work with Canadian ventures developing Internet of Things (IoT) products and services. With communications vendor Cisco Systems Inc. predicting the global IoT market will be worth $1.1 trillion USD by 2021, there’s plenty of incentive to develop more advanced and secure IoT technologies.

The accelerator will not provide any funding to firms selected to take part, according to Leo Lax, the executive managing director at L-Spark. Nor do they have to pay any fee to take part or share any of the intellectual property they develop. But they do have to put their R&D resources towards developing a proof of concept on a hardware and software platform being provided by the three technology firms partnered with the accelerator.

Source: BlackBerry and Telus partner with Ottawa-based accelerator for new IoT-focused program | Finfancial Post

 

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Internet of Things Devices Have a Serious Security Problem | PCMag

Alex “Jay” Balan, Bitdefender’s Chief Security Researcher, begs to differ. “Internet of Things is not optional,” he said here at RSA. “It’s not the user’s choice. Everything is becoming smart.”

Every network printer is an IoT device, he pointed out. “People believe that the printer is secure because it’s a physical box. I can take the paper out, and nobody can print. But in reality, anyone on the network can access the printer, and most have a management console without a password.”

Getting access to every document a printer ever printed doesn’t even require an exploit, because the functionality is simply present and available.

Source: Internet of Things Devices Have a Serious Security Problem | PCMag

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Protecting IoT: It’s Up To You | Forbes

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The Internet of Things is everywhere, and it continues to grow as manufacturers add computing capacity to more and more of their products. All of these Internet-connected devices present a security risk, and it’s a lot bigger than an intruder adjusting a homeowner’s Nest thermostat a couple of degrees. We can all help reduce the security risk associated with IoT by adopting the concept of herd immunity.

Source: Protecting IoT: It’s Up To You | Forbes

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A Legislative Shot at Internet of Things Security | Just Security

Last Monday, a bipartisan group of Congressional members introduced in the Senate and House The Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2019. Sponsored by Senators Mark Warner (D-VA), Cory Gardner (R-CO), Maggie Hassan (D-NH), and Steve Daines (R-MT) and Representatives Robin Kelly (D-IL) and Will Hurd (R-TX), the bill is a revised version of an earlier bill of the same name introduced in 2017 with different co-sponsors.

Source: A Legislative Shot at Internet of Things Security | Just Security

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‘Internet of things’ or ‘vulnerability of everything’? Japan will hack its own citizens to find out | CNN

Children playing in a middle school gym in Indonesia; a man getting ready for bed in a Moscow apartment; an Australian family coming and going from their garage; and a woman feeding her cat in Japan.

All of these were live on the internet on Friday to anyone who knew the right address, through cameras with little or no security, whose owners probably don’t realize they’re broadcasting every second online.
The rise of the “internet of things” (IOT) — a vague term covering anything which connects to the internet that you usually wouldn’t expect to — has flooded households and businesses across the world with poorly secured devices easily accessible online, from webcams and printers to “smart” fridges and speakers.
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Build security into your IoT plan or risk attack | Network World

The Internet of Things (IoT) is no longer some futuristic thing that’s years off from being something IT leaders need to be concerned with. The IoT era has arrived. In fact, Gartner forecasts there will be 20.4 billion connected devices globally by 2020.

An alternative proof point is the fact that when I talk with people about their company’s IoT plans, they don’t look at me like a deer in headlights as they did a few years ago. In fact, often the term “IoT” doesn’t even come up. Businesses are connecting more “things” to create new processes, improve efficiency, or improve customer service.

Source: Build security into your IoT plan or risk attack | Network World

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Cheap Internet of Things gadgets betray you even after you toss them in the trash | Tech Crunch

You may think that the worst you’ll risk by buying a bargain-bin smart bulb or security camera will be a bit of extra trouble setting it up or a lack of settings. But it’s not just while they’re plugged in that these slapdash gadgets are a security risk — even from the garbage can, they can still compromise your network.

Source: Cheap Internet of Things gadgets betray you even after you toss them in the trash | Tech Crunch

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