Success with the Internet of Things Requires More Than Chasing the Cool Factor | HBR

Many companies begin an internet of things (IoT) journey with great expectations, only to end up with disappointing business results. Gartner recently estimated that through 2018 “80% of IoT implementations will squander transformational opportunities” and fail to monetize IoT data. And a new survey by Cisco found that one-third of all completed IoT projects were not considered a success. In my experience with dozens of organizations implementing IoT solutions, those that achieved their expected ROI changed their traditional business approaches in one or more of the following ways:

Source: Success with the Internet of Things Requires More Than Chasing the Cool Factor | Harvard Business Review

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Blockchain Will Improve Internet of Things (IoT) Security | Forbes

Because the Internet of Things (IoT) is creating its own ecosystem, the biggest challenge for the industry is how companies secure and manage the exponential growth of decentralized endpoint devices. Unfortunately, most security experts only know how to defend against attacks from a centralized perspective. Most Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) only understand centralized networks and depend on choke points or linear cyber kill chains that focus on traditional perimeter and inbound security protocols to defend against malware, viruses and other attacks that inevitably overwhelm networks and damage servers, devices and workstations.

Source: For Chief Information Security Officers Blockchain Will Improve Internet of Things (IoT) Security | Forbes

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The Internet Of Things: Now There’s A Growth Story | Seeking Alpha

Depending on who you ask, you might get a different definition of the Internet of Things (IoT). Some might even call it the Internet of Everything or the Internet of Everywhere. Whatever name might stick in the future, one thing is certain – it is going to change the way we live our lives.

For the purpose of being consistent throughout this report, I will use Kevin Ashton’s definition of The Internet of Things:

“The Internet of Things means sensors connected to the Internet and behaving in an Internet-like way by making open, ad hoc connections, sharing data freely, and allowing unexpected applications, so computers can understand the world around them and become humanity’s nervous system.”

Source: The Internet Of Things: Now There’s A Growth Story | Seeking Alpha

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The Internet of Things to Come in Cybersecurity | Security Intelligence

“Stop checking whether or not you’ve achieved your step goal. Right now.

The widespread use of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) strategies and the shift towards interoperability within the Internet of Things (IoT) — the interconnection of computing devices embedded in everyday objects such as watches, refrigerators and cars via the internet — has laid ground for a lot of innovation, especially when it comes to monitoring health care data. Think fitness watches and trackers such as the Apple Watch and Fitbit. You’re probably wearing one of those right now, aren’t you?”

Source: The Internet of Things to Come in Cybersecurity | Security Intellivence

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IoT Security Incidents Rampant and Costly | DARKReading

Internet of Things breaches and security incidents have hit nearly half of the companies that use such devices, and the cost to deal with these attacks is usually more than traditional breaches, according to recent survey results.In two separate reports, each of the studies found that 46% of respondents report they suffered a security breach or incident as a result of an attack on IoT devices.

Source: IoT Security Incidents Rampant and Costly | DARKReading

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Internet of Things’ security: The alarms are buzzing | Blasting News

Many people are still unsure what the concept of #internet of Things is, while experts on the subject are already throwing out staggering numbers on how many devices will be ‘online’ by 2020. From the mind-boggling 30 billion devices as predicted by the analysts at “Gartner,” to a bit more toned down predictions of 26 connected devices, as is the opinion of another analytical group, “Stringify.” Even if the concept is still unclear to everybody who uses a modern machine or an appliance, an obvious question of #Security comes to mind when you consider such an enormous number of ‘things’ connected online. Is there a significant threat or do you think that nobody cares about your ‘networked’ coffee machine?

Source: Internet of Things’ security: The alarms are buzzing | Blasting News

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Home gadgets open to hackers | The Telegraph

Consumers who buy internet-enabled devices such as televisions, refrigerators and even kettles are leaving themselves open to hackers who could use them to gain access to their bank accounts, one of the country’s most senior police officers has warned.Many household appliances can now be linked up to the internet to help streamline the home. Fridges can provide reminders of when to buy milk, while televisions can offer advice on what programmes to watch.

Source: Home gadgets open to hackers | The Telegraph

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Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers | Motherboard

Security researchers have found a new bug that would allow hackers to take full control of several types of Internet of Things devices.

Hackers could hijack thousands of Internet of Things devices around the world, such as security cameras, due to a flaw in a piece of software used by several major manufacturers.

Security researchers found a bug in an open source software library that, when tested on an Internet of Things camera, allows hackers to remotely access the video feed of a camera, install a backdoor in the device, or block the camera’s owner from accessing it. Researchers say it would work on other IoT devices as well—in other words, hackers would have total control over the vulnerable products, they said.

Source: Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers | Motherboard

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Finding the balance of security, mobility in an Internet of Things world | FederalNewsRadio.com

The use of mobile technologies and the evolution to the Internet of Things (IoT) is reshaping the way government executes on its mission. From smartphones and tablets that let employees work from anywhere at any time to the wide adoption of WiFi at places like the Pentagon.At the same time, the move to mobile presents a major challenge—cybersecurity. How can agencies secure the ever-growing number of devices?

Among the most startling findings of a Homeland Security Department report from March was that mobile devices could become an avenue to attack back-end computer systems containing the data of millions of Americans and sensitive information related to federal government functions.

Source: Finding the balance of security, mobility in an Internet of Things world | FederalNewsRadio.com

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Enabling a healthy relationship with IoT in healthcare | IoT Agenda

An aging demographic, shrinking budgets and increased demands are driving the urgent need for solutions across the healthcare sector. While running headfirst into innovation may be tempting, the healthcare sector presents a series of challenges, meaning that IoT developers need to take a slow-and-steady-wins-the-race approach if they are to achieve results that are as futureproofed as possible; their solutions could become a matter of life and death.

Source: Enabling a healthy relationship with IoT in healthcare | IoT Agenda

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