So you’re doing an IoT project. Cute. Let’s start with the basics: Security | The Register

The Internet of Things is going to solve climate change, fix our political system, and ensure that you can always find a parking spot. Some see a future of 15 billion connected devices.

Now, just the tiny matter of deploying them. There’s a long way between all IoT’s utopian promises and the reality. We’ve never attempted anything like this before.

The challenges are immense. How do those devices work autonomously? How do they work together? How do you balance the energy overhead of sending data from a low-powered sensor against processing it locally? What’s the best format for your data and how can you use it when it arrives back at base?

Source: So you’re doing an IoT project. Cute. Let’s start with the basics: Security |The Register

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Will China dominate the global Industrial Internet of Things market? | Information Age

Will China dominate the global Industrial IoT market? image

The Greater China region is poised to lead the global Industrial IoT (IIoT) market. This is based on an in-depth report based on interviews with mobile operators including; Asia Pacific Telecom Group, China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, Far EasTone and Taiwan Mobile. The operators outline how the combination of fast internet speeds, data analytics, artificial intelligence (AI) and the IoT is transforming the region’s industrial sector.

GSMA Intelligence estimates that there will be 13.8 billion IIoT connections globally by 2025. Greater China accounts for approximately 4.1 billion of these connections or a third of the global market.

Source: Will China dominate the global Industrial Internet of Things market? Information Age

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Crypto Case Study: Internet of Things – Crypto Disrupt

Over the past decade, there have been an increasing amount of connected devices making up the internet of things (IoT). This network provides increasing benefits by connecting devices and people around the world and collecting data which can be used to personalize products and services. The lack of transparency in current IoT platforms brings into question data security and privacy, which continue to be significant issues in light of GDPR laws enacted across Europe. As increasing amounts of data are collected on centralized platforms, data storage costs will increase and ultimately become inefficient to handle.

Source: Crypto Case Study: Internet of Things – Crypto Disrupt

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The Internet of Things Will Need Better Ways to Locate Stuff | IEEE Spectrum

This illustration shows robots in a warehouse placing boxes on conveyor belts and operating various pieces of equipment.

It’s hard to find things sometimes. Ask anyone who’s lost their keys.

Now imagine trying to locate thousands of sets of keys that are wildly roaming around. This dada-esque scenario is precisely what Internet of Things (IoT) networks will soon have to deal with—keeping track of dozens, hundreds, or thousands of devices as they move about.

Typically, the solution has been to have devices report back to some sort of hub in a centralized network. And that works well if the devices aren’t particularly mobile—stationary sensors tracking weather changes, for example—or if there aren’t very many of them. But the advent of 5G means there may soon be too many devices for a centralized hub to reliably track.

Source: The Internet of Things Will Need Better Ways to Locate Stuff | IEEE Spectrum

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The internet of things is built to leak | TheHill

Much has been made of the security risks inherent to the “Internet of Things,” or IoT, the vast (and growing) universe of connected products ranging from fitness trackers and smart TVs to self-driving vehicles and virtual assistants. Last week, news broke that an Amazon Echo recorded a family’s conversation and sent the audio to someone in their contacts list. Other headlines have told of hackers illegally accessing data from “smart” teddy bears, baby monitors, cardiac implants and other devices; last month, the governments of the United States and Britain issued an ominous joint warning that Russian hackers could use the IoT to siphon data from individuals and organizations alike.

Source: The internet of things is built to leak | TheHill

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Internet of Things: Where Does the Data Go? | IoT Evolution World

Today, IoT is no longer anything extraordinary. We are nearly surrounded by smart devices in our homes, offices, hospitals, places we go out with friends.

However, IoT technology is still something new and unfamiliar to most of us. Being an average user, what do you think when asked what IoT is?

You may be fairly certain that IoT is (a) a mix of devices and technologies (b) being put together and (c) communicating with one another via data created and flown through the system.

And you’re getting close to the truth, but how many devices create the data?

How is the data transferred through the system?

How is the processed information sent back?

How will a user receive the information: in real time or in parts?

What is the relevance of analytics in this context?

To answer the questions, we need to dig deeper into the Internet of Things development.

Source: Internet of Things: Where Does the Data Go? | IoT Evolution World

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10 Charts That Will Challenge Your Perspective Of IoT’s Growth | Forbes

Source: 10 Charts That Will Challenge Your Perspective Of IoT’s Growth | Forbes

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How Much Does it Cost to Develop an IoT Application? | CustomerThink

IoT is an acronym for the Internet of Things. It is the technology by which one device is connected to the other device on the internet. In other words, Internet of Things can be defined as the network where physical devices such as vehicles, appliances, sensors etc are connected to one another and share data.

There is a great scope in this field of technology. There are various fields in which IOT can be implemented. Some of these include health sector, smart home, smart city, industrial automation, and many more. Hence, a lot of IoT applications can be developed.

Source: How Much Does it Cost to Develop an IoT Application? | CustomerThink

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Is the Internet of Things impossible to secure? | ITProPortal

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The use of Internet of Things (IoT) technology is growing rapidly as more consumers and businesses recognise the benefits offered by smart devices. The range of IoT hardware available is huge, including everything from smart doorbells and connected kettles to children’s toys. What’s more, this is not only limited to smart home tech for consumers. IoT sensors are being increasingly used by businesses of all sizes across numerous industries including healthcare and manufacturing. However, despite its life-enhancing and cost-saving benefits, the IoT is a security minefield. So, is it even possible to secure the IoT?

Source: Is the Internet of Things impossible to secure? | ITProPortal

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