Internet of Things Security – are you failing to prepare? | Real Wire

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“For several years, the IT industry has enthusiastically extolled the virtues of the Internet of Things (IoT), eager to enlighten us to the difference that living in a connected world will make to all our lives.

Now the IoT is here – in our homes and in the workplace. Its uses range widely, from domestic time-savers like switching on the heating, to surveillance systems, to “intelligent” light bulbs, to the smart office dream.

This proliferation of devices and objects collect and share huge amounts of data. However proliferation also has the potential to create greater opportunities for vulnerabilities. Moreover, because these devices are connected to one another, if one device is compromised, a hacker has the potential opportunity to connect to multiple other devices on the network.”

Source: Internet of Things Security – are you failing to prepare? | Real Wire

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These Jaw-Dropping Facts Will Change Your Mind About the Internet of Things | The Motley Fool

The Internet of Things (or IoT) is a tech buzzword that many people have heard of but still don’t quite understand. The first thing you should know about the IoT is that its definition can be simplified down to the connection of formerly unconnected things to the Internet.

If you’ve ever seen a smartwatch then you’ve seen the IoT firsthand. But the IoT goes far beyond consumer devices and includes things like internet-connected manufacturing equipment and healthcare devices, all of which allow companies to create new automation processes and track data like never before.

To understand the IoT’s full impact and how it’s changing our world, check out these amazing Internet of Things facts:”

Source: These Jaw-Dropping Facts Will Change Your Mind About the Internet of Things | The Motley Fool

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The anatomy of an IoT solution: Three layers to success | Enterprise Apps Tech News

“The pace of new technology becoming available is coming at organisations fast – and it’s only going to get quicker. IT leaders are under pressure to not only get up to speed on what new technology is best for the business but to also ramp it up into operations.In this data-driven age, innovation often means incorporating new technologies like blockchain, the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning. Specifically for IoT, McKinsey estimates that IoT could generate $11.1 trillion a year in economic value by 2025. This is motivating IT and business leaders to explore the potential of implementing IoT solutions into their business.

To successfully develop and deploy an IoT application, it’s important to establish the right architecture. This is imperative to outline because IoT solutions merge the physical world of Operations Technology (OT) with sensors, actuators and communication devices, and the digital world of Information Technology (IT) with data, analytics, workflows, and applications.”

Source: The anatomy of an IoT solution: Three layers to success | Enterprise Apps Tech News

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Security Surprises Arising from the Internet of Things (IoT) | Forbes

My brother can’t function in the morning until he has a cup of coffee. So I use his daily routine as an example.

Picture my brother stumbling down to the kitchen one morning only to find his internet-enabled coffee maker won’t work. There’s a message on his iPhone: “We have taken control of your coffee pot and unless you pay $5, you won’t have your coffee.” This actually hasn’t happened. At least, not yet.

I have been talking about the security threats to common household items connected to the internet – that is, the Internet of Things (IoT) – for several years now, and unfortunately, every other dire warning has come true so far. Upper management has to take greater notice of risks exposed both in the products they produce and the products that they use and take action to mitigate those risks. Recent events underscore this need.”

Source: Security Surprises Arising from the Internet of Things (IoT) | Forbes

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Securing DNS Against the Threat of Things | Infosecurity Magazine

“The Internet of Things (IoT) is big and growing rapidly. Gartner recently forecast that 8.4 billion connected “things” will be in use globally this year; set to increase to over 20 billion by 2020.

While likely to revolutionize how we live, work, and play, the IoT also presents a security challenge to the networks that support it.

Highlighting this threat, a US university campus with over 5,000 connected devices, including vending machines, was recently infected with malware that created a form of DDoS attack. Sending repeated and frequent DNS queries – which were predominantly related to seafood – the university’s servers were overloaded, and resulted in the IT network becoming slow and unresponsive.”

Source: Securing DNS Against the Threat of Things | Infosecurity Magazine

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Kill Chain & the Internet of Things | DARK Reading

‘IoT “things” such as security cameras, smart thermostats and wearables are particularly easy targets for kill chain intruders, but a layered approach to security can help thwart an attack.

The concept of a kill chain attack has been around for several years. The term originated from the military, but computer scientists at Lockheed-Martin Corporation were the first to use this term in the field of cybersecurity, describing a kill chain framework to defend computer networks in 2011. Its relevance has taken on new meaning in our current era of IoT devices and botnet attacks. IDC predicts that by 2020, 30 billion connected “things” will be a part of the digital infrastructure.’

Source: Kill Chain & the Internet of Things | DARKReading

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A Hacker’s POV of Internet of Things Security | Nextgov.com

“Today, internet of things devices outnumber humans. Internet-enabled children’s toys, household appliances, automobiles, industrial control systems and medical devices—new IoT devices are being designed and released every day but many of these devices are built with little-to-no security in place. Given the rapid growth of these devices and unregulated market, it’s no surprise that these devices represent a growing threat as well as a major opportunity for hackers”

Source: A Hacker’s POV of Internet of Things Security | Nextgov.com

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Cloudflare Orbit Wants to Secure the Internet of Things a Whole New Way | WIRED

THE INTERNET OF Things security crisis continues apace. New botnets crop up to conscript routers and security cameras, hackers exploit medical devices to compromise entire hospital networks, and smart toys still creep on kids. Internet infrastructure company Cloudflare, though, has spent the last 18 months working on a fix.Cloudflare’s traditional offerings range from content delivery to DDoS defense, but today it’s announcing a service called Orbit, which it conceives as a new layer of defense for IoT. It has the potential to make connected devices more secure than ever—but also raises a few questions in the process.

Source: Cloudflare Orbit Wants to Secure the Internet of Things a Whole New Way | WIRED

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